Savings Distribution Calculator

This calculator is designed to help you determine how much of your savings remains after a series of withdrawals. Enter your starting amount, how much to withdraw and how often and we will calculate your expected final balance.

This Financial Calculator requires a Browser with Java™ applet Support. If you are seeing this message you will need to download SUN's Java™ Plug-in. This can be done simply, and automatically, by clicking the link below:

Get the Java™ Plug-in!

Definitions

Starting amount
The starting balance or current amount you have invested or saved.

Years
The total number of years you are planning to continue your withdrawals.

Periodic withdrawal
The amount that you plan on distributing (or withdrawing) from your savings or investment each period. The investment period options include monthly, quarterly and annually. This calculator assumes that you make your withdrawal at the beginning of each period.

Rate of return
The annual rate of return for this investment or savings account. The actual rate of return is largely dependant on the type of investments you select. From January 1970 to December 2004, the average compounded rate of return for the S&P 500, including reinvestment of dividends, was approximately 11.5% per year. During this period, the highest 12-month return was 64%, and the lowest was -39%. Savings accounts at a bank pay as little as 1% or less. It is important to remember that future rates of return can't be predicted with certainty and that investments that pay higher rates of return are subject to higher risk and volatility. The actual rate of return on investments can vary widely over time, especially for long-term investments. This includes the potential loss of principal on your investment.

Compounding
Earnings on an investment's earnings, plus previous interest. This calculator allows you to choose the frequency that your investment's interest or income is added to your account. The more frequently this occurs, the sooner your accumulated interest income will generate additional interest. For stock and mutual fund investments, you should choose 'Annual'. For savings accounts and CDs, all of the options are valid, although you will need to check with your financial institution to find out how often interest is being compounded on your particular investment.